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Retirees Should Consider Renting a Home

20 Jun 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsHome ownership has long held an honored position as an integral part of the American dream.

But when retirement time comes, rethinking that dream could be in order. Sometimes renting an apartment is the better bet both financially and in terms of the retiree’s changing lifestyle and health.

When people plan for retirement, they focus on things like how much they have saved, how much Social Security will pay, and whether they have pension. But as you get older, you also need to think about such issues as whether you can keep mowing the lawn or handling other day-to-day chores that homeownership requires. If you must hire someone to do them for you, how much will that eat into what may already be a tight monthly budget?

The truth: There’s no answer that will fit everyone’s situation. So, retirees or those approaching retirement, should weigh their personal pros and cons.

There’s a lot to think about. Should you sell the house you raised your family in and downsize to something more suitable for just the two of you? If you’re planning to move to somewhere else in the country to enjoy your retirement, is it more prudent to buy in that new location, or is leasing the way to go to give you more flexibility if it doesn’t work out?

Some things retirees should think about as they ponder the own verses rent question include:

Maintenance issues. When you own a home, every leaky faucet, electrical problem or faulty appliance is yours to handle as best you can. If you can do it yourself, great; but often, these household repairs mean calling in a professional at a sometimes-exorbitant cost. When you rent, it’s up to the landlord or the property management company to take care of the repairs.

Mobility. Selling a house can be a long and complicated process, and you never know what the market might be like when the time arrives. Whereas breaking a lease is much simpler. If your children are scattered all over the country, you may want to move closer to one of them. Also, if your health takes a turn for the worse, selling a home can be a significant burden on your family.

The inheritance. For many people, a house is the most valuable asset in their estate and they might want to leave it to their children in the will. Once again, it’s a matter of weighing the pros and cons. Having a home to pass down to the children is a noble gesture, but it is not always feasible.

Before considering whether owning or renting is the right option, it’s essential to review all the intricacies of your situation and decide based on your finances and your overall health and well-being.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

myvalleynews.com

Why it Makes More Sense to Rent than Buy

11 Jun 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Apartments

Nearly two-thirds of Americans live in areas where it is more affordable to rent than buy.

A majority of Americans are renting on the cheap — at least, compared to what they’d be paying if they bought a home.

Most Americans (64%) live in a county where renting takes up a smaller portion of one’s paycheck than buying, according to a recent report released by real estate data firm Attom Data Solutions. And yet in more than half (54%) of housing markets — 240 of 447 U.S. counties — buying a median-price home is actually more affordable than renting a three-bedroom property.

So why the seeming contradiction? Even if they can’t afford to buy, the majority of people are renting in areas where they get the most bang for their buck. The buy-versus-rent calculus is shifting toward renting being more affordable. With a strong jobs market they want to stay mobile and often can’t afford to buy near urban centers where they’re more likely to get a job and a job at higher wages.

Renting may be better than owning to build wealth — if you’re disciplined to invest the money you save by not owning a propertys. When considering buying and building wealth through equity appreciation versus renting, and reinvesting in a portfolio of stocks and bonds, property appreciation does not change the results.

What’s contributing to this shift toward renting?

Interest rates are expected to increase throughout 2018, making buying a home with a mortgage less affordable for many — even younger Americans who aim to pay off their home in 20 or 30 years and reap the appreciation of a rise in home values. And tight housing inventory across the country is fueling competition for homes that makes them more expensive.

Plus, the “drive until you afford” mentality has made many once-affordable suburbs and exurbs vastly more expensive. Large swaths of the New Jersey and New York commuting belt have seen double-digit house price increases over the last 12 months, for instance. In fact, single-family rental is the fastest-growing segment of the housing market.

The tax bill has further complicated the math in deciding whether to rent or buy. Under the 2017 tax code, a family of three with an annual income of $150,000 would be better off buying if their rent exceeded $1,507 per month. But with the new tax code, they’d have to pay more than $1,885 per month to make buying worthwhile.

More renters may also find themselves priced out of the housing market, because home prices are appreciating more quickly than rents in 59% of markets.

What’s more, in 60% of markets rents are rising faster than wages. As a result, more renters may also find themselves priced out of the housing market, because home prices are appreciating more quickly than rents in 59% of markets. And the old adage of not spending more than 30% of your income on rent (or a mortgage) is increasingly difficult in cities like San Francisco and New York.

For more information contact HHHunt.

Source: marketwatch.com

Homeownership Hidden Costs Often Top $9K a Year

05 Jun 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsPrepare yourself by knowing the less-obvious costs of owning a home. Insurance, maintenance and more add up faster than you think.

Buyers too often focus on a home’s list price or mortgage payment to determine what they can afford. However, the numerous less-obvious costs associated with homeownership can affect the monthly bottom line.

To help home buyers budget more accurately, Zillow and Thumbtack identified several common but often overlooked home expenses and calculated what homeowners around the country could expect to pay for them. The analysis also included utility cost estimates.

While each extra expense might seem small, they cost U.S. homeowners, on average, $9,080 a year, according to the report.

Unavoidable costs

Nationally, homeowners pay an average of $6,059 a year in unavoidable costs, which include homeowners insurance, property taxes and utilities. Since nearly half (47 percent) of home shoppers today are first-time buyers, many of these extra costs may come as a surprise.

Maintenance expenses

Nearly all homeowners (96 percent) have made some kind of improvement to their homes. While many complete these projects themselves, those who pay professionals can expect to spend an average of $3,021 for the six most common hired home projects: carpet cleaning, yard work, gutter cleaning, HVAC maintenance, house cleaning and pressure washing.

Budget planning

More than a third of buyers go over budget on a home purchase. In addition to the mortgage, the price includes estimated property taxes, insurance, PMI, utilities, taxes, HOA fees and closing costs.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

zillow.com

Guide to Downsizing

01 Jun 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

Abberly Waterstone Apartments, Stafford, VAWhen it comes time to consider downsizing your home, there are a mix of emotions and stressors you may have never encountered before. For seniors, it’s a situation that sometimes comes about out of necessity and sometimes simply as a way of improving the quality of retirement years.

As the number of Baby Boomers entering retirement continues to climb in the US, the reasons to start downsizing are more apparent than ever:

  • Economic necessity. It’s common for many older adults to be faced with unexpected medical expenses, growing homeowners insurance rates, and rising utility costs. Selling the house and moving into a more affordable space is often the solution.
  • Convenience. If you’re tired of doing all the housework that comes with a larger home, you’re not alone. A lot of retirees opt for smaller homes where upkeep is less of a responsibility.

In terms of the cost benefits, retired seniors stand to save significantly when moving to a smaller space. Consider that for the typical single-family home, heating and cooling accounts for 42% of the energy bill. When the square footage of your home shrinks, so does that energy bill.

Moving to a smaller home could also help you save on:

  • Mortgage payments
  • Property taxes
  • Maintenance (lawn, pest control, snow removal)

If you’re preparing for retirement or have already retired and you’re now considering downsizing, know that you’re in good company. A recent poll concludes that 37% of Baby Boomers plan to move later in life. Of those planning to move again after retirement, 47% said they’d like to downsize.

Choosing to downsize to an apartment in Stafford, VA in retirement isn’t always motivated by economics, but it is always affected by it. Even for retirees belonging to a high tax bracket, downsizing is a consideration for practical reasons.

Finding a place to live

Would you prefer to stay in the same area or are you excited about moving to a new place? If you’re moving somewhere new, take into consideration all the amenities you’ll need now and later on. Check for proximity to hospitals, grocery stores, and other essentials. Downsizing should make life easier—if you have to travel 45 mins to weekly doctor appointments, think about how that will affect your quality of life.

No matter the reason you have for considering downsizing, you are wise to contemplate its advantages. Not only do you have the opportunity to start anew, perhaps in closer proximity to family, but you can drastically improve your quality of life in retirement. By downsizing to a smaller home, you are freed from the upkeep responsibilities of owning a large home. You’ll potentially save big on standard costs associated with homeownership and most importantly of all, you can finally take time to relax.

For more information contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

bankrate.com

Should I Rent or Own My Home?

24 May 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Apartment HomesWith 10 months left on a 2-year lease, my husband and I are tripping over ourselves in the rent vs. buy dance.

Buying seems like the next most logical life step for two gainfully employed recently wed 30-somethings. With a mortgage we’d pay less for more space and have something to call our own. We’d finally feel settled, build up equity and do typical HGTV things like renovate bathrooms over and over again.

But at what cost?

For us, buying would most likely mean moving further outside the city, adding an undesirable commute and a tax on our most valuable asset: time. It would mean dropping hefty sums of money on unexpected expenses for things I’ve always taken for granted in my rentals like roofs and air conditioners and carpet. It would mean tying ourselves to a multi-hundred-thousand dollar anchor.

Most people will try to talk you out of renting with a logical financial argument in favor of buying. They’re not wrong. It just makes mathematical sense that in most major American metros, buying is cheaper than renting in the long run.

And then there’s the social pressure. Once I was trying to convince a friend to sell her place, move closer to the city and rent an apartment like mine since the commute was wearing on her. Her response was that she didn’t want to “go backwards” in life. It had never occurred to me that I was behind because I didn’t own a house.

For me, financing a suburban American dream I don’t want to live doesn’t make sense. Where most look at homeownership as a step in the right direction towards personal and financial success, I see it as a big expensive burden that moves me deeper into debt (albeit a strategic investment) and further away from my desired urban, unrooted, minimalist lifestyle. That’s hard to maintain as a first-time homebuyer.

So we decided we’re not in a rush to buy.

I’m sure home buying will be for us eventually, but for now we’re content to save up some more cash and relish the often overlooked finer things of the renter’s life.

Renters don’t have to fix even the simplest things that break — Our door lock busted the other day. I called our landlord and he had a locksmith there to fix it (on his dime) pronto. Could I change out a lock? Yes. Would I rather someone else do it? Yes.

The biggest renovation decision a renter has to make is what color paint to use.

Renters don’t have to buy or replace expensive basic life necessities — I’d be content to go my entire life never ever paying money for a toilet.

The bank doesn’t have your life by the throat for 30 years — Home buying is smart debt if you do it right but debt makes me queasy regardless. I save up and pay cash for my big purchases. I worked three jobs in grad school to avoid taking out loans. And if I could rummage it up, I’d pay cash for a house. (Might have to be a tiny house though.)

Renters don’t cut the grass — This, of course, depends on your housing situation, but if you’re in an apartment without a lawn or a house rental with built-in HOA maintenance, you’re lawn mower free, my friend.

You can pick up and leave whenever you want — This is the big one for me. If I land in a place I don’t love, I like knowing I’m out at the end of the lease. I also like knowing I could leave the city all together. I’ve been in Charlotte for 6 years. My family is here. My business is here. I should have bought a house a long time ago. I’m not going anywhere. But I like knowing I could go anywhere if I really wanted to. That freedom, I think, is the best part of being a renter.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

charlotteagenda.com

Forget Owning, Baby Boomers and Millennials are Renting

08 May 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsRenting traditionally has been viewed as one rung on the housing ladder: First, you rent an apartment, then move on to purchase a starter home, which is followed by the family home, where most people spend the majority of their years. Renting has always been a step in the process and rarely the endgame.

Based on the growing number of renters in major cities throughout the country it’s clear that attitude is changing. Instead of viewing renting as a short-term phase, an increasing number of residents are choosing rental housing specifically because it offers a more-flexible lifestyle than homeownership.

This is especially true for baby boomers and millennials, two of the fastest-growing groups of renters. Whether just starting out in their career or settling into retirement, both generations are seeking a lifestyle that offers mobility, convenience and community.

There’s no question that apartment living keeps getting better. We’ve just started to see a slight shift in boomers actually deciding to forgo a mortgage for rent in high-end, highly serviced properties with lots of amenities, and believe that we’ll see more. And they’re not necessarily moving from the suburbs directly into downtown locations. More likely, they’re staying fairly close to home in communities they’ve known for decades and are opting for nearby town center locations. Millennials, on the other hand, are enamored by the eclectic, energetic urban environment and thus love living downtown close to art, culture and entertainment.

Mobility needed: Regardless of age, mobility is one of the top reasons people decide to rent. For millennials just entering the workforce or in the process of building their careers, the ability to relocate is a major factor. Even if they are in a financial position to purchase a home, millennials may choose to rent to have the flexibility to take advantage of new job opportunities as they arise.

Boomers value mobility, as well — with their children grown and out of the house, many have realized they no longer want or need a large suburban home. Instead, they’re opting to rent in urban environments that offer greater flexibility for travel and the option to leverage the equity in their homes. Many baby boomers also are working longer than their parents did. They still want to be close to their job and are not yet ready to retire to a new locale, but they are empty-nesters who want a vibrant, walkable lifestyle.

Transportation and accessibility play an important role. With busier-than-ever lifestyles, more and more people are simply refusing to spend hours commuting every day. Especially in cities such as Washington, where the commute between downtown and the outlying suburbs can take hours during peak travel times, rental housing close to work or with easy access to public transit offers residents the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life, with less time stuck in traffic.

The convenience of living in the middle of things: Similarly, we’re seeing residents choose renting over homeownership for the sake of convenience. For busy boomers who are ready to give up the yard work and other home-maintenance tasks, renting is an attractive alternative. If something breaks or goes wrong, all they have to do is pick up the phone and call the property manager to take care of it. The same goes for young professionals who may lack the time, experience or willingness to address these issues.

We’re also witnessing apartment owners and operators go beyond basics like regular maintenance by offering amenities such as package storage, and fitness centers and pools to enhance the resident experience.

Creating a sense of community: In addition to making residents’ lives easier, modern apartment amenities are designed to encourage socialization. These are the types of experiences that today’s renters are looking to incorporate into their lifestyles.

This sense of community is important to boomers, who may be leaving a social network behind as they move away from the suburbs; as well as to millennials who are eager to make new connections personally and professionally, especially if they are new to the area. With shared common spaces and experiences, apartment living creates organic opportunities for residents to make these connections and build on them.

In today’s economy, we can rent almost anything we need, including music, movies, clothes and cars. Having all of these options available to us suggests that people’s view of ownership is shifting. It’s natural that this trend extends to our homes, giving people more choice over where and how they live.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

washingtonpost.com

Homeownership Hidden Costs Often Top $9K a Year

01 May 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Apartments

Prepare yourself by knowing the less-obvious costs of owning a home. Insurance, maintenance and more add up faster than you think.

Buyers too often focus on a home’s list price or mortgage payment to determine what they can afford. However, the numerous less-obvious costs associated with homeownership can affect the monthly bottom line.

To help home buyers budget more accurately, Zillow and Thumbtack identified several common but often overlooked home expenses and calculated what homeowners around the country could expect to pay for them. The analysis also included utility cost estimates.

While each extra expense might seem small, they cost U.S. homeowners, on average, $9,080 a year, according to the report.

Unavoidable costs

Nationally, homeowners pay an average of $6,059 a year in unavoidable costs, which include homeowners insurance, property taxes and utilities. Since nearly half (47 percent) of home shoppers today are first-time buyers, many of these extra costs may come as a surprise.

Maintenance expenses

Nearly all homeowners (96 percent) have made some kind of improvement to their homes. While many complete these projects themselves, those who pay professionals can expect to spend an average of $3,021 for the six most common hired home projects: carpet cleaning, yard work, gutter cleaning, HVAC maintenance, house cleaning and pressure washing.

Budget planning

More than a third of buyers go over budget on a home purchase. In addition to the mortgage, the price includes estimated property taxes, insurance, PMI, utilities, taxes, HOA fees and closing costs.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

Source: zillow.com

Reasons to Rent in Retirement

24 Apr 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsHomeownership and retirement don't always mesh. Here's why you might consider renting as a senior instead.

Though owning a home has long been hailed as the American Dream, that's not necessarily the case when it comes to retirement. Since 1990, homeownership has declined among 55-64 year-olds, and experts expect this trend to continue in the coming years.

Before you prepare to live out your senior years as a homeowner, here are a few reasons to consider renting instead.

1. Your housing costs will be fixed

The problem with homeownership is that even in the absence of a mortgage payment, you still face countless unknown costs. Your property taxes, for example, could go up significantly if you have a year when your home is reassessed. Similarly, as your home ages, your regular maintenance costs could easily go from manageable to downright astronomical.

Consider this: The typical homeowner spends anywhere from 1% to 4% of his or her home's value on annual upkeep. If you're dealing with, say, a $500,000 property, that's a pretty huge range, but you can't discount the possibility of creeping toward its high end as you make your way through retirement.

Then there are repairs to consider -- problems that aren't expected, but rather pop up suddenly and constitute a huge financial burden. Do you really want to deal with those when you're on a fixed income?

When you rent a home, you're locked into the same monthly payment regardless of whether the roof starts to leak or the heater needs repairs. If the local lawn service raises its rates one year to cut the grass, that's not your problem. Of course, the downside of renting is that your landlord could raise your monthly payments once your lease expires -- but if that happens, you could always find a new home or try to negotiate.

2. Owning may not help much from a tax perspective

One benefit of being a homeowner is getting to deduct the interest on your mortgage, thus saving you money on taxes. But if you're coming into retirement mortgage-free, which is the case for the majority of homeowners 65 and over, then that benefit no longer exists.

Furthermore, it used to be the case that you could deduct your property taxes in full, and as we all know, those apply even once your mortgage is paid off. But as part of the recent tax changes that took effect this year, the state and local tax (SALT) deduction, which property taxes are part of, is now capped at $10,000. This means that if you live in a state with high taxes, you might lose the bulk of that write-off (at least for the next seven years), thus making homeownership a less appealing prospect.

3. You'll get more flexibility

The beauty of being retired is not being tied to a job, or that job's location. This means that if you want to pick up and move to a state with warmer weather or get closer to your grandchildren, you're free to do so -- provided your home isn't holding you back.

As a renter, you have the option to leave your home once your lease ends, or, in many cases, break your lease prematurely with a reasonable bit of notice. Selling a home, by contrast, could take months, and there are numerous expenses you might encounter along the way. You may therefore be better off unloading your home prior to retirement and buying yourself that added leeway later in life.

Now this isn't to say that renting a home in retirement is always the right move. At the same time, it pays to think about the benefits of renting at a time in your life when you're no longer bringing home a steady paycheck.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

The Motley Fool

More Seniors are Choosing to Rent, Here's Why

17 Apr 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Rent Vs. BuyAn interesting phenomenon among seniors who are selling their home is their changing attitude about buying another. Younger home sellers are typically focused on quickly buying another home. Their lifestyle has changed and they need to sell and buy another.

Most senior sellers will become senior homebuyers but there is an increasing trend among seniors selling their home: They don’t intend to buy another home and they are making the decision to rent.

“I think we’ll rent for a while” is an increasing response to my question: “Have you thought about your next home?”

Rent? Here are folks who have worked hard all their lives to pay off the mortgage so that they could enjoy retirement in their own home and now they want to rent?

Isn’t renting for the economically challenged, the young millennials, the unstable? Why throw money away renting when equity-rich seniors can sell and buy the home of their dreams?

The homeownership rate for seniors has been declining for the last 10 years as an increasing percentage chose to rent rather than own a home. A recent national survey of seniors who rent were asked the question: Why?

One-out-of-ten planned to buy a home within the next 6 to 12 months, about half could not afford to buy but four-out-of-ten responding seniors who could afford to buy, won’t. They’re content to remain tenants.

Why do you suppose more seniors are choosing to rent than own?

Replacement home too costly

Most seniors who are selling say that they would like to downsize into another, perhaps smaller, single-level home, closer to shopping, medical facilities and family. We have homes meeting that description in our county but they are usually higher in price than the market value of a senior’s existing home.

If family is in the region, perhaps relocating to another state is not an option. Faced with reinvesting all their sale proceeds and perhaps the obligation of a new mortgage, many choose not to sell their home or if they sell, they will rent.

Demands of homeownership

Often seniors don’t have the same physical strength at 60 as they did at 40. Some seniors are physically unable to maintain, remodel or repair everything that’s routinely necessary.

Rural properties require even more attention. Whether clearing brush or mowing the back yard, it takes good health and energy to maintain a home.

Renting is cheaper

Despite what the real estate community would have you believe, every homeowner knows that at the end of the day it’s more expensive to own a home than rent one.

Absent a mortgage, homes are still expensive to maintain. Ask anyone who has had to replace a leaking roof, a new HVAC system or replace a deck.

Retirees likely have less income than when they were working and many depend upon Social Security as their primary source of income to pay household expenses. Renting may not be the lifestyle they would prefer but it is one that they can afford.

Been there, done that

While some seniors enjoy puttering around their home with projects and working in their yard or garden, many don’t. They have spent a lifetime tied to their homes with the responsibilities of ownership while their friends have been vacationing. These seniors do not want another long-term commitment to a home. As tenants, mobility finally becomes an option.

Fear of another real estate bubble

Most of our grandparents never psychologically recovered from the Great Depression. They became compulsive savers, skeptical of debt and leery of investing in the stock market.

The 2008 Great Recession and the collapse of home values left a similar impression on many retirees. They have personally experienced how quickly the value of their home can disappear. They have watched helpless as friends and neighbors lost their home to foreclosures. They know first-hand that the real estate market has up and down cycles and they are not going to get caught in another.

There are 75 million baby boomers who are on the verge of retirement. For the next 20 years an average of 10,000 people each day will reach age 65, which has historically been the retirement phase of life. What’s fascinating is after a lifetime of homeownership more are choosing to rent.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

Mountain Democrat

Buying a Home is NOT a Good Investment

10 Apr 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Apartments

Some Americans believe that buying their own house is the best and smartest investment they'll ever make.

There are several valid reasons for buying a home. But buying as an investment or as the cornerstone of your long-range financial plan should not be one of your primary motivators. If your home doubles in value over the next few years, then great! Consider it a bonus. There are several reasons you shouldn't look at your home as an investment, especially in today's economy.

An inefficient investment

The main reason not to buy a bigger or fancier home simply because "it's an investment" is that there are much better ways to put your extra dollars to work. Real estate has generally appreciated around 4% to 5% per year on average, and this can be higher or lower depending on your specific location. Depending on what statistic you look at, home prices have historically appreciated at 3.4% to 5.4% annually over the past 20 years.

Compare this with an average annual return of 9.1% for an S&P index fund, 7.2% for the average mutual fund, and 7.16% for the ultra-safe 30-year Treasury, although it pays less these days, around 3.65%.

Simply put, the risks are not worth the rewards.

Don't forget about mortgages

Your mortgage will cause you to pay much more for your home than the agreed-upon price, which also will eat away at your returns. Let's say you buy a $300,000 home and put 20% down, so you finance the remaining $240,000 at 4.5% (about today's rate for a 30-year mortgage). If your home appreciates at 5% annually, by the time your mortgage is paid off, it should be worth around $1,296,583.

However, because you are paying interest on your mortgage, when you add up all of the payments, you're really "paying" a total of $497,794 for the house. This implies a total return of $798,809 after 30 years, or just 3.2% per year on an annualized basis.

Poor risk/reward ratio

When you consider the risks involved with owning a home, it is not really a prudent long-term investment. In fact, the risks associated with owning a home are quite comparable to the level of risk associated with investing in an index fund. From top to bottom, the S&P lost 58% of its value before bottoming out. It has since recovered to a level that is 13% above its pre-crisis peak.

In contrast, the U.S. real estate market fell about 35% from its peak and is currently well below its pre-crisis peak.

There are good investments in real estate, but your home isn't one of them

If you really want to "invest" in real estate, the only worthwhile way to do it is to buy an actual investment/rental property. These can be very lucrative if done correctly. In theory, an investment property should be a house (or apartment building, commercial space, etc.) that you buy and someone else pays for over time.

To sum it up, there are several ways of putting your investment dollars to work that simply make more sense than buying your own home. It just doesn't make sense for "investment" to be the reason to spend more on a house in the hopes of producing long-term gains.

For more information, contact HHHunt Apartment Homes.

Source: Daily Finance


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