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The Rent or Buy Debate Doesn't Make Sense

31 Jul 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt Apartments

When you buy a home, you pay for things you don’t have to pay for as a renter: loan interest, property taxes, insurance, and even maintenance and repair costs. That’s part of the argument in favor of renting: there are so many additional costs and factors that get overlooked. That goes for both sides, though, and the details vary depending on the situation. Here are a few commonly overlooked factors that make up the specifics.

  • How long you’ll live in the home: This varies depending on the market, but in general, the longer you’re in the home, the better, because your costs are spread out over time.
  • The cost of housing in your area: In most cases, people rent because houses are just too expensive, but it all depends on the market in your area. If renting is extremely costly in your area, it might be more affordable to buy a home.
  • The opportunity cost of your taxes and insurance: What kind of long-term return could you get if you invested this money instead, in the stock market, a CD, or even a “high interest” savings account?
  • The opportunity cost of your down payment: Similarly, how much of a return could you get if you invested that lump sum instead?

It’s impossible to say renting or buying is a better decision because each one of these factors (and more) depends on your unique situation. You have to consider where you live, what kind of house you’re looking for, how much you pay in rent, how much you’ll pay in the future...the list goes on and on.

A Rent vs. Buy calculator is a great tool for simplifying these complexities, depending on your own individual specifics. Still, a calculator can only do so much. It might tell you the better long-term decision on paper, but that still doesn’t mean it’s the best decision for you.

Your Home is a Purchase, Not an Investment

Most experts agree that you shouldn’t think of your primary home as an investment. Contrary to popular belief, real estate barely outpaces inflation over time. Sure, you could time the market, flip a house, or buy a rental, but that’s different from expecting your primary home to earn you a sweet return. The investing myth is another valid argument against buying. Many people buy homes they can’t afford or stretch their finances to pay for expensive home projects because they buy into this myth.

The bottom line is: sometimes it’s smarter to rent, and sometimes buying can work in your favor. Rather than giving in to one side or another, it’s more helpful to learn the rules, crunch the numbers, then do what works—and feels right—for you.

For more information, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

Excerpts: twocents.lifehacker.com

Forget Owning, Baby Boomers and Millennials are Renting

08 May 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsRenting traditionally has been viewed as one rung on the housing ladder: First, you rent an apartment, then move on to purchase a starter home, which is followed by the family home, where most people spend the majority of their years. Renting has always been a step in the process and rarely the endgame.

Based on the growing number of renters in major cities throughout the country it’s clear that attitude is changing. Instead of viewing renting as a short-term phase, an increasing number of residents are choosing rental housing specifically because it offers a more-flexible lifestyle than homeownership.

This is especially true for baby boomers and millennials, two of the fastest-growing groups of renters. Whether just starting out in their career or settling into retirement, both generations are seeking a lifestyle that offers mobility, convenience and community.

There’s no question that apartment living keeps getting better. We’ve just started to see a slight shift in boomers actually deciding to forgo a mortgage for rent in high-end, highly serviced properties with lots of amenities, and believe that we’ll see more. And they’re not necessarily moving from the suburbs directly into downtown locations. More likely, they’re staying fairly close to home in communities they’ve known for decades and are opting for nearby town center locations. Millennials, on the other hand, are enamored by the eclectic, energetic urban environment and thus love living downtown close to art, culture and entertainment.

Mobility needed: Regardless of age, mobility is one of the top reasons people decide to rent. For millennials just entering the workforce or in the process of building their careers, the ability to relocate is a major factor. Even if they are in a financial position to purchase a home, millennials may choose to rent to have the flexibility to take advantage of new job opportunities as they arise.

Boomers value mobility, as well — with their children grown and out of the house, many have realized they no longer want or need a large suburban home. Instead, they’re opting to rent in urban environments that offer greater flexibility for travel and the option to leverage the equity in their homes. Many baby boomers also are working longer than their parents did. They still want to be close to their job and are not yet ready to retire to a new locale, but they are empty-nesters who want a vibrant, walkable lifestyle.

Transportation and accessibility play an important role. With busier-than-ever lifestyles, more and more people are simply refusing to spend hours commuting every day. Especially in cities such as Washington, where the commute between downtown and the outlying suburbs can take hours during peak travel times, rental housing close to work or with easy access to public transit offers residents the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life, with less time stuck in traffic.

The convenience of living in the middle of things: Similarly, we’re seeing residents choose renting over homeownership for the sake of convenience. For busy boomers who are ready to give up the yard work and other home-maintenance tasks, renting is an attractive alternative. If something breaks or goes wrong, all they have to do is pick up the phone and call the property manager to take care of it. The same goes for young professionals who may lack the time, experience or willingness to address these issues.

We’re also witnessing apartment owners and operators go beyond basics like regular maintenance by offering amenities such as package storage, and fitness centers and pools to enhance the resident experience.

Creating a sense of community: In addition to making residents’ lives easier, modern apartment amenities are designed to encourage socialization. These are the types of experiences that today’s renters are looking to incorporate into their lifestyles.

This sense of community is important to boomers, who may be leaving a social network behind as they move away from the suburbs; as well as to millennials who are eager to make new connections personally and professionally, especially if they are new to the area. With shared common spaces and experiences, apartment living creates organic opportunities for residents to make these connections and build on them.

In today’s economy, we can rent almost anything we need, including music, movies, clothes and cars. Having all of these options available to us suggests that people’s view of ownership is shifting. It’s natural that this trend extends to our homes, giving people more choice over where and how they live.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

washingtonpost.com

Renting is NOT Throwing Money Away

27 Mar 2018

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsYou might have heard the old adage “renting is throwing money away.” It seems like common sense. You don’t buy anything when you rent, but you get to keep the house you buy. However, nothing could be further from the truth.

Buying a home is a lot more complicated than “Rent, except you get to keep it.” Not only are there major additional costs that you’ll be paying for the rest of your life (like repairs, renovations, and property tax), but for the first several years of your mortgage, you’re barely even gaining any equity!

Should you keep renting? Is renting better than buying? Or should you purchase a home? Is buying the better choice? Your answer is going to depend on a massive number of factors, including:

  • The local price-to-rent ratio.
  • How long you’ll live there.
  • Your alternative investment options.
  • Your assumptions about inflation and investment gains.
  • Maintenance, repair, insurance, property tax and capital expense costs.
  • The rate at which rents rise.
  • Et cetera, etc., etc.

You get the picture. This myth that “renting is throwing money away” is wrongheaded. In fact, it’s dangerous. It oversimplifies a life-changing, six-figure decision. It’s probably caused thousands (or millions) of people to buy houses they later regret.

While it’s true that you’re buying an asset when you purchase a house, it’s an asset that barely keeps pace with inflation, and you lose the opportunity to make other investments. Not to mention, renting is underrated.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

lifehacker.com

When Renting is the Right Decision

06 Nov 2017

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsConventional wisdom suggests buying a home makes more financial sense than renting. In many cases, this is true. However, renting is sometimes a smarter approach than buying.

As with any financial decision, all of the options and circumstances need to be weighed before jumping in. Making a major purchase requires doing some homework. The following are some reasons why renting can be more beneficial than buying.

Youth

The typical first-time home buyer is 31-years-old. People who are younger than that and uncertain about their futures should not feel pressured into buying simply because it is presumed to be the “adult” thing to do. Renting and feeling your financial way, which can include seeing how a job pans out or where one’s budget lies after paying off debts, might make more financial sense than buying.

High price-to-rent ratio

Buying may seem like a wise idea, but it could be causing people to spend more than necessary, particularly if they check the price-to-rent ratio and find homes in their area are not fairly priced.

Figuring a P/R ratio includes finding two similar houses (or condos or apartments) where one is for sale and the other is for rent. Divide the sale price of the first place by the annual rent for the second. The end result is the P/R ratio.

The higher the P/R ratio, the more sense it makes to rent instead of buy.

Home prices continue to rise

Some people find themselves being priced out of certain neighborhoods or cities. While the typical worker’s earnings increased a meager 0.3 percent during the study period, median house prices were up by 17 percent. Wages have not recovered from the Great Recession as quickly as home prices have, and some people may need to rent out of necessity.

A market shortage makes it harder to find an affordable home. The number of homes available for sale in many areas of the country has fallen below the number that is required for the market to be in balance. Therefore, even when a home becomes available, demand drives the price up to where it may not be affordable or fiscally smart to purchase. In such instances, renting may be the best option.

One doesn’t meet the buying criteria

Individuals should not buy a home based on market conditions or pressure from others. Instead, they should buy when they’re financially ready. This means being out of debt; having between three and six months of expenses in an emergency fund; enough cash for a 10 to 20 percent down payment on a fixed mortgage; and when their mortgage payment will be no more than 25 percent of their monthly take-home pay.

Renting can be a smart move in many instances. Only when individuals are financially and emotionally ready to buy should they begin searching for their first homes.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

villagenews.com

Why Renting is Often Better

27 Apr 2017

Posted by Darren Kincaid

HHHunt Apartments

Once you get your career going, you may begin to think about settling down; maybe you are looking for a place to live. One of the biggest questions is whether you should rent or buy your home.

For many, buying is one of life’s biggest aspirations. But for others, buying property doesn’t really have a place in their life. It can be difficult choice, and one that’s going to have a big impact on your bank-balance. There are pros and cons to both buying and renting.

Buying a home has been traditionally been the goal for many people. Once you’ve paid off your mortgage or mortgages, your home is your own. A home also represents a large chunk of your credit security.

Fundamentally, this is how many look at it: monthly mortgage payments may be a headache when times are tough, and it may be increasingly difficult to get one but at the end of the day you’re paying into something that you’ll eventually own outright.

The same cannot be said for renting, and this is the main criticism. However, there are many benefits to renting.

Firstly, you’ll need a much smaller initial down payment to secure an apartment. Provided you treat the property right, you’ll receive your deposit back in full at the end of your lease.

Secondly, you have flexibility and freedom. You can choose to move– in a completely different region –more quickly and easily than you would be able to if you owned a home.

Thirdly, the upkeep of any rented property is the responsibility of the landlord. Homeowners will have to pay for home repairs and ensure they have insurance coverage.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive

Economic Voice

15 Reasons Why Renting Is Better Than Buying

12 Apr 2017

Posted by Joseph Coupal

HHHunt ApartmentsFor many, renting a home is just a temporary stop on the path to home ownership. It’s the standard argument: Why throw away money on rent that could be used to build home equity?

But these days, the renting narrative is changing. Millennials are not investing in homes like we thought and the housing market is far from “fixed.” The industry leaders advertise a sellers’ market, meaning homeowners can expect to see multiple offers on their homes as the inventory remains low. While that’s great for homeowners, it means home buyers can expect dangerous bidding wars and price increases.

For that reason, many people are putting the American dream of picket fences and front porches on hold and choosing to make one of their smartest decisions to date. It’s a personal decision to rent or buy, but there are many pros to renting your next home rather than buying.

Here are 15 convincing arguments for renting a home — and they’re not all financial.

1. Buying and selling a home is difficult for everyone involved

Selling or buying a home is more stressful than bankruptcy, divorce, and the loss of a loved one, according to one poll. Homes are on the market for an average of four weeks, and 37% of sellers reported reducing the asking price at least once. Plus, if you’re in a long-distance relationship, do yourself a favor and rent. A 12-month lease is a whole lot easier to break or buy out than a 30-year mortgage — nevermind the added stress moving can place on an already suffering relationship.

2. Property taxes can kill you

Many homeowners are unaware of unexpected costs that come with owning a home of your own. Fees, such as property taxes, insurance, and maintenance, add up quickly. For landowners in Hawaii, the property tax on a home worth $179,000 will do little to raise eyebrows, amounting to only $487 annually, according to WalletHub. But those in New Jersey are stuck paying a tax rate of 2.35% that equates to $4,189 annually on a house of the same value. Taxes can fluctuate, but rental terms are consistent across the duration of your lease.

3. You can take time to repair your credit

Irresponsible spending habits in college and those sneaky credit card scams will haunt you for years. Sometimes, it can take more than seven years to fix your credit. If you’re in the bad-credit club, like one-third of the American population, it might be best to rent rather than buy. Those with low credit scores will find buying a home laborious, and it’ll be wise to wipe clean those credit blemishes before jumping onto the buying scene or making any substantial purchases in general. Renting to re-establish a solid payment history can be a good way to bide your time.

4. You’re financially unable

Those with irregular incomes, such as freelancers or small-business owners, prefer renting as a more stable monthly option. Homeowners are at the mercy of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae — and who knows what their future plans are. Today, mortgage rates are still low, hovering around 4%. But before you think our nation’s real estate woes are over, remember the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was under 3.75% in summer 2016. Then, it shot upward after the presidential election and averaged 4.24% in December. If you’re still unsure about your ability to overcome any potentially rocky housing trends, consider renting while establishing a bigger emergency fund.

5. You remain flexible

Buying a home means choosing a location we want to plant roots in for at least a few years. For those who aren’t exactly sold on their current living situation, investing in real estate would be a mistake. Mortgages and other ownership obligations are like concrete shoes — don’t expect to pick up and move anytime soon. When the opportunity comes to accept your dream job on the opposite coast or marital bliss rides on relocating to another city, the last thing you want to do is get bogged down in selling a home.

6. Maintenance issues are not your problem

Flat head or Phillips. Socket verses pipe. If you have no answer, you might want to rent your next dwelling. Not all of us were blessed with the handy gene. Homeowners are often forced to fork over a sizable chunk of their savings to make impromptu and unexpected home repairs. But renters only need to place a call to their property managers when the sink drains are clogged or the dishwasher gets finicky.

7. Upkeep is less expensive

Say goodbye to weekends filled with long afternoon brunches and lazy days at the pool. That large backyard that originally sold you on your property? Well, it needs to be mowed — again. And last week’s storm really did a number on your gutters over the garage. Homeowners don’t have the luxury to bypass time-consuming chores that renters ignore. And renters need not worry about general housework and upkeep required of homeowners.

8. It makes filing taxes harder

If you think taxes are intricate now, wait until you buy a home. Yes, there are some valuable tax breaks homeowners receive, but processing mortgage interest deductions, home repair expenses, and rental income takes considerable time. That’s something renters don’t worry about. In fact, renters are already out socializing care-free, knowing their refund checks are already on their way.

9. There are options for roommates

Roommates are a great option if you’re looking for help shouldering the cost of living expenses. Having someone around to split the cable bill and vent about workplace drama is great, but with homeownership, one person is responsible for the payment at the end of the month. So when that flaky roommate is late on rent, the difference must be made up elsewhere. Apartment complexes, on the other hand, are experienced working with multiple tenants in one location and offer options for individual leases.

10. You have more access to amenities

Yes, you might enjoy the peace and quiet of a home in the country or a friendly neighborhood environment in the ‘burbs, but you’ll miss other amenities. Renting in a community allows you access to things, such as a community pool, fitness center, dog parks, and Wi-Fi. If you still want access to these perks after leaving the comfy confines of rental agreements, you’ll need to shell out serious dough.

11. You can grab cash bonuses

Many rental communities offer additional cash bonuses if you work for local companies. If you’re a local employee, you might be eligible for rental stipends or bonuses just for working close to home. Check to see whether your employer is on the list of nearby companies to max out every discount and money-saving trick in the book.

12. Urban living at a cheaper price

It’s been said millennials prefer city living over driveways and acreage, but they are unable to afford the fees that accompany urban life. Living near universities and vivacious night life is not cheap, and purchasing an Instagram-worthy loft is a merely a pipe dream for some. Depending on where you want to live, trendy areas, such as warehouse or arts districts, major cities, and beach communities, are typically more renter friendly. Finding affordable homes to buy might require moving into less popular areas.

13. There’s better security

Gated communities come at a high price, but most rental complexes have security features already included in their agreements. This is a welcomed benefit for women, single renters, or tenants living in urban environments. Homeowners will find neighborhoods with these extra precautions come at a price.

14. You remain adverse to risk

Financial advisers might say we must “risk it to get the biscuit,” but that’s easier said than done in a housing market that’s seen so much variation lately. Therefore, many are choosing the safer option to rent rather than investing in real estate. In addition to affordable prices, renters are also adverse to potentially debilitating changes in the housing market. Although experts are showing a recovery, a better, more accurate description is stabilizing. Words, such as “foreclosure” and “mortgage rates,” are still often paired with phrases of uncertainty. And that’s worrisome to fiscally conservative Americans.

15. You have the ability to invest elsewhere

It’s recommended home buyers put 20% down on a home to avoid being house poor. Even when considering upfront rental fees and deposits, it’s still cheaper than the tens of thousands of dollars it takes to buy a home. Some renters might already have potential savings stacked away for this very purpose, but with other uncertainties and future questions, it might be best to invest that money elsewhere. A few grand could do wonders for your future retirement or help hack away at those student loans that still burden you.

For more information on apartments, contact HHHunt.

#HowYouLive
cheatsheet.com

Buy vs. Rent: Common Myths Busted

03 Jun 2014

Posted by Joseph Coupal

When weighing major life decisions, everyone seems to have the answer. You should marry this person, drive that car, and have so many kids—all by a certain age. Never mind if it’s actually the best choice for you!

Home ownership is no different. Deciding whether to buy or rent always comes with a generous helping of opinion. So how do you separate fact from fiction?

Let’s start by breaking down three common myths.

Myth #1: Buying a home is the grown-up thing to do.

Many folks look at home ownership as a rite of passage into adulthood. According to the National Association of Realtors, the typical first-time home buyer is 31 years old. So if you’re 25 and feel like you’re behind the curve because you haven’t bought a home yet, stop worrying. There’s no reason to rush into a big purchase just because friends or family tell you it’s what you’re supposed to do. Real grown-ups know it’s not the money-smart choice in every situation.

During times of transition, renting for a year or two gives you time to get your feet on solid ground before making a life-changing decision. Here are a few examples:

  • You just graduated from college and aren’t ready to plant your roots in one place yet.
  • You moved to a new city and aren’t sure which neighborhood is right for you.
  • You’re in the military and don’t want to lose money on a home every time you’re stationed in a new place.

Dave also recommends waiting at least a year after getting married to buy a home. After all, it takes a year of being married to know how close to your mother-in-law to buy. Spend your first year getting to know each other and learning how to manage your money well as a team. You have until “death do you part” to take your next big plunge!

Myth #2: It’s stupid to pass up a good deal when the market is hot.

You found the perfect home, and the sellers are practically giving it away. It just might be the deal of the century. Even though Sallie Mae’s got her clutches on your pocketbook, you’d be dumb to walk away, right?

Wrong!

With real estate, you make money by buying the right thing at the right time—not by taking advantage of the market.Never buy a home based solely on the market. Buy when you’re financially ready. Here’s how you know you can afford it:

  • You’re out of debt.
  • You have 3–6 months of expenses in your emergency fund, plus enough cash for a 10–20% down payment on a 15-year fixed mortgage.
  • You’re paying cash up front, or your mortgage payment is no more than 25% of your monthly take-home pay.

Jumping into home ownership with debt and no emergency fund is like diving into a pool with no water. You’re sure to hit rock bottom. First the A/C breaks, then the roof leaks. Next thing you know, you’re turning to credit cards and loans to pay for it all—and the hole you’re in just keeps getting bigger.

There’s nothing wrong with renting while you work to get your finances in order. In fact, Dave encourages it! Take time to lay the right foundation before you take the leap, and your home will be a blessing instead of a curse.

daveramsey.com

Are You Ready To Buy a Home?

24 Feb 2014

Posted by Joseph Coupal

All over the country, homes are selling like crazy. They’re being snatched up as soon as they go on the market, and homebuyers are willing to pay more to get the home they want. In fact, you can probably name several friends who are looking to buy a home in the next few months.

Conditions in the housing market have changed so quickly that it’s easy to get caught up in the frenzy and catch house fever yourself. But before you hop on that bandwagon, think through these three reasons why now may not be the time to buy a home.

1. You’re in Debt

If you have any debt, your focus right now is to pay it off. Current statistics show the average American household has more than $15,000 in credit card debt, shells out 8–11% of their income for car payments, and owes more than $32,000 in student loans. Add the average monthly mortgage payment of more than $1,000, and you’ve got a recipe for bankruptcy. If you want to buy a home and have peace of mind, pay off your debt before you take the next step toward homeownership.

2. You’re Not Prepared for the Unexpected

Following the Baby Steps, once you’re out of debt, it’s time to build your emergency fund of three to six months of expenses. Now you’ll have the cash to take care of unplanned expenses (like a storm-damaged roof) or pay the bills, including your mortgage payment, if you lose your job. It’s one extra bit of insurance against Murphy—the idea that whatever can go wrong will go wrong.

3. You Don’t Have a Big Enough Down Payment

While Dave prefers you use the 100%-down plan and pay cash for a home, a conservative 15-year mortgage with a payment that’s no more than 25% of your take-home pay is also an acceptable option. You should pay at least 10% down, but 20% is even better. With a 20% down payment, you’ll avoid private mortgage insurance costs, which can add $1,800 a year to the payments on a $200,000 mortgage. You can start socking away money for your down payment after you’ve built your emergency fund.

You can see how dealing with any of these three issues would make homeownership a struggle. If your goal is to buy a home, make it a priority to overcome these obstacles and you’ll be on your way to owning your home the right way.

daveramsey.com

Gen Y is Not Buying Homes

30 Dec 2013

Posted by Joseph Coupal

As the one generation looks to retire while the other is soon to be at its peak earning potential, the opinions and approaches to the property market differ markedly between Gen Y and Baby Boomers.

The two generations prefer different types of property and have different reasons for entering the property market.

Baby Boomers, unlike their Gen X and Y proponents, tend to have married in their early 20s and subsequently became home owners early.

Born between 1946 and 1965, boomers are the richest generation, having cashed in on several property booms. They hold over half Australia’s housing and financial assets.

Gen Y, which encompasses those born between 1981 and 1995, are nowhere near as asset rich.

As travel is now more affordable and desirable, this demographic is often choosing to spend their money on seeing the world rather than being tied down to a mortgage.

While this generation is often referred to as ‘Generation Rent’, this isn’t necessarily to do with affordability… they like the flexibility of renting.

Gen Y’s favor apartments.

Many Gen Y’s who choose to buy into property are using it as an investment vehicle. Data shows that 52% of Gen Y buyers surveyed are planning to buy an investment property instead of a home to live in during the next 12 months.

In contrast, Baby Boomers are generally looking for a home. They may also be increasingly trending towards apartments, but want larger units with quality fittings and finishes.

With more disposable income due to their children having moved out of home, Baby Boomers are looking to rent apartments within close proximity of entertainment and dining precincts.

They want the three A’s – action, accessibility and amenity – rather than the three traditional P’s – product, price and position.

Your Investment Property

Renting a Home is Good for Job Security

19 Nov 2013

Posted by Joseph Coupal

Many nations encourage home ownership, and it is something that most young people still aspire to, but a new study has pointed out this might not be such a good thing. It has found that encouraging people to purchase homes could lead to higher unemployment levels in the future.

The research was carried out in the UK and at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, and the study found that when the rates of homeownership increase in countries then unemployment can begin to rise a few years later. Settling down in a home that you own makes many people reluctant to move just for the sake of the job.

In addition researchers found that homeownership could lead to longer commutes to work, wasting money and time. Neighborhoods with high levels of homeownership are also more likely to be opposed to new businesses opening up locally, something that can stifle entrepreneurship.

Researchers based their study on data collected in developed nations including the US. The study does acknowledge that high levels of unemployment are connected to other factors, but in spite of this it feels there is a clear link with homeownership and that the effects can be considerable. According to the report in CNN Money.com, doubling the rate of homeownership in an area could lead to the unemployment rate doubling as well. Apparently this trend has been particularly apparent since the 1980s, and researchers in the study are calling for people to become less obsessed with homeownership. They feel it makes the labor market much less flexible, and over time could cause jobs to gradually disappear. As an example, researchers compared Spain and Switzerland, as both homeownership and unemployment rates are particularly high in Spain, while levels are particularly low in Switzerland.

It’s easy to think from the tone of the report that the authors are against homeownership, but apparently this isn’t the case. They point out that older workers often want to own their own home in preparation for retirement, and in this case it would have little effect on the employment rates. In countries such as Switzerland and Germany people tend to purchase homes towards the end of their working life, something the researchers feel is efficient. However when people are young it makes more sense for them to be mobile and rent a home.

Realty Biz News


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